Padma Lakshmi Embedded With Immigrant Chefs to Tell the Real Story of American Food

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

From Esquire

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

You’d be hard-pressed to find a longer resume in the world of food journalism—or even entertainment—right now than that of Padma Lakshmi. An Emmy-winning TV host, she’s also a cookbook author, a venerable producer, and a powerful activist. Her reign on Top Chef as a host and a judge, plus an EP, is nearing 15 years, and in 2009, she co-founded the Endometriosis Foundation of America. She works with both the United Nations Development Program and serves as an ambassador to the ACLU. And if you’re wondering who currently serves as the mayor of Twitter, look no further than her inspiring, occasionally incendiary, feed.

It’s an incredibly wide range, and it all informs her addictive, compelling new show, Taste the Nation. The 10-episode series, which she developed, produced, and hosts, debuts Thursday on Hulu. The driving

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How Food Businesses Nationwide Are Responding

These are unprecedented times. It seems like the whole world has been brought to its knees, from the rapid and destructive spread of COVID-19 to the protests in response to police brutality and the murders of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd. The food industry isn’t exempt. So as things develop, we’ve asked people working in the food industry, from coast to coast, to share what they’re seeing in their communities, how they’ve been affected, and how they’re responding.

Tuesday, July 7

“The American Indian Movement and the Black civil rights movement—we’ve always supported each other.”

Robert Rice, Pow Wow Grounds, and Frank Paro, American Indian Movement, Minneapolis: Ed’s Note: Robert Rice is the owner of Pow Wow Grounds, a coffee shop and gathering place for the Native American community. He counts students and Native elders among his most loyal customers. Partway through this conversation, one such

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10 important life lessons Anthony Bourdain taught us through food

If you or someone you know is in crisis, call the U.S. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255, text TALK to 741741 or visit SpeakingOfSuicide.com/resources for additional resources.

It’s been two years since beloved celebrity chef, storyteller and author Anthony Bourdain died at the age of 61.

Known to millions as one of the first rock star of the food world, Bourdain remained humble about his later-in-life success. His vibrant legacy continues to live on in the many shows he hosted, books he wrote and words of wisdom he passed on to others.

Here are 10 important lessons Bourdain taught the world about food and the importance of making connections with others.

1. An incredible experience doesn’t have to cost much

In one of the most memorable episodes of “Parts Unknown,” Bourdain shared a meal with then-President Barack Obama. “I spoke to him as another father of a young girl,

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David Chang and Other Top Chefs to Host Virtual Cooking Classes

The upside to spending an inordinate amount of time at home due to the pandemic is that many people have had the opportunity to get creative in the kitchen. And now, at-home chefs have a unique opportunity to take their skills to the next level with virtual cooking classes courtesy of AirBnb, taught by award-winning chefs like David Chang.

“As a chef, we connect with our guests through our food, but we don’t often have the chance to share and explore the stories behind dishes with diners directly,” the Momofuku founder said in a press release. “These Online Experiences give us the opportunity to do that, while paving the way for chefs from around the world to connect with guests virtually from afar.” Chang’s class is called “One-Pot Deliciousness,” and will teach guests his favorite recipe for Chicken and Rice Donabe with ingredients that are accessible and flavorful.

See the
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