Chefs

Watch Indigenous Chefs Share Culture, History and Delicious Cuisine Through ‘Resilience Recipes’ Series

They ate at the Smithsonian’s Mitsitam Native Food Café and other restaurants as part of their studies on native food sovereignty, a movement to reclaim and restore Indigenous food systems.

“I really loved the class, it was so interesting,” said Bianca Nolde-Lopez ’22, an anthropology major on a pre-med track, and sprinter on the women’s track and field team. “It was so eye-opening that all this Indigenous knowledge has been carried through oppression, and pandemics and so much else that was forced upon them.

“And yet they’re still here, creating this amazing artwork and food, so intricately weaving their history and culture into modern life.”

The pandemic forced Lewis to cancel plans to bring students to the May conference of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association in Toronto. She and Stremlau collaborated on an alternate plan. Lewis proposed hosting “Food-preneurs”—the chefs putting a modern spin on Indigenous food. The

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David Chang and Other Top Chefs to Host Virtual Cooking Classes

The upside to spending an inordinate amount of time at home due to the pandemic is that many people have had the opportunity to get creative in the kitchen. And now, at-home chefs have a unique opportunity to take their skills to the next level with virtual cooking classes courtesy of AirBnb, taught by award-winning chefs like David Chang.

“As a chef, we connect with our guests through our food, but we don’t often have the chance to share and explore the stories behind dishes with diners directly,” the Momofuku founder said in a press release. “These Online Experiences give us the opportunity to do that, while paving the way for chefs from around the world to connect with guests virtually from afar.” Chang’s class is called “One-Pot Deliciousness,” and will teach guests his favorite recipe for Chicken and Rice Donabe with ingredients that are accessible and flavorful.

See the
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Padma Lakshmi Embedded With Immigrant Chefs to Tell the Real Story of American Food

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

From Esquire

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

You’d be hard-pressed to find a longer resume in the world of food journalism—or even entertainment—right now than that of Padma Lakshmi. An Emmy-winning TV host, she’s also a cookbook author, a venerable producer, and a powerful activist. Her reign on Top Chef as a host and a judge, plus an EP, is nearing 15 years, and in 2009, she co-founded the Endometriosis Foundation of America. She works with both the United Nations Development Program and serves as an ambassador to the ACLU. And if you’re wondering who currently serves as the mayor of Twitter, look no further than her inspiring, occasionally incendiary, feed.

It’s an incredibly wide range, and it all informs her addictive, compelling new show, Taste the Nation. The 10-episode series, which she developed, produced, and hosts, debuts Thursday on Hulu. The driving

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